Digital Communications & User Experience Design Strategist

Blog

Posted by: In: Web Content 25 Feb 2013 Comments: 4

“Optimizing web images” means that you attempt to achieve the optimum quality (best looking) and the optimum file size (smallest) at the same time. This is challenging since “best looking” and “smallest file size” tend to work against each other. Poorly optimized web images are some of the most common problems on the web. They contribute to an unsatisfactory user experience, either because they load slowly or they just don’t look very good. Read more…

Posted by: In: Web Content 16 Feb 2013 Comments: 0

All web images must be JPEG (.jpg), GIF (.gif) or PNG (.png) file formats, and must be RGB color mode (not CMYK like print images). TIF, EPS, PSD, BMP and other file types will not display in a web browser. The standard resolution for web images has always been 72 dpi but now some hi-resolution “retina” monitors display images at 144 dpi. Read more…

Posted by: In: Web Content 20 Nov 2012 Comments: 1

Have you ever copied text from a Word document or another source and pasted it into your web content management system (CMS), only to find that the formatting of the text gets messy and full of odd characters? If you are not careful you may end up with text that looks like this in your Word document: Read more…

Posted by: In: Web Content 26 Sep 2012 Comments: 0

Because GIF and PNG images can have transparent backgrounds, it is possible to place them on a colored background or over a background image on a web page so the background shows through. (Read more about images that allow transparency in Which image file type is best.). However, placing a COB photo (“cut out background” or “cut out of background”) or other irregular-shaped image over a background can be difficult. Read more…

Posted by: In: Usability Testing, UX Design 04 Aug 2012 Comments: 0

Since your website is typically your most important marketing communications asset, it pays to focus on delivering the best possible user experience. User experience (UX) design has become a core discipline in web development. And rightly so, because despite our best efforts to predict how people will use our sites, it is very hard to do. That’s because the moment we know what a button should do, we can no longer view it from the perspective of someone who has no preconceived notion. Read more…